News:Refurb & Interiors

Rhapsody of the Seas enters Sembawang Shipyard

Rhapsody arrives at the dock Rhapsody arrives at the dock

After five consecutive extended seasons in Australia, Royal Caribbean International’s 78,491gt Rhapsody of the Seas entered Sembawang Shipyard in Singapore Thursday for a month-long US$54m makeover.

‘Rhapsody of the Seas has been a tremendous success in Australia and New Zealand where she has hosted over 175,000 guests and developed a loyal following,’ said Royal Caribbean Cruises Australia’s commercial manager, Adam Armstrong.

‘Originally scheduled for only a two-week drydock for regular maintenance, we have since extended the project to four weeks in order to allow a full revitalisation of the entire ship,’ he added.

Armstrong said the revitalisation not only covers furnishings and decor, but a host of brand new venues and amenities, including five new specialty dining outlets.

Radiance of the Seas, which joined sister ship Rhapsody of the Seas in Australia for the 2011/12 wave season and departs Sydney on April 5, underwent a major makeover in May last year.

Both ‘revitalised’ ships return to Australia in October for the 2012/13 season when they will be joined by Voyager of the Seas, the largest ship to be based Down Under for an extended programme. They will offer itineraries ranging from one- to 18-nights around Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific.

Posted 02 March 2012

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Helen Hutcheon

Australasia correspondent

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