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American Spirit in Glacier Bay (Photo: American Cruise Lines)

American Cruise Lines bags more prime days in Glacier Bay

American Cruise Lines was awarded additional prime use days as an exclusive tour vessel in Alaska's Glacier Bay. This means the company will be able to spend more time there than ever before. The five-year contract will go into effect Jan. 1 for the 2016 spring itineraries. 

American Cruise Lines is the only non-excursion company to be granted tour vessel exclusivity.

In order to protect and preserve the park’s resources, regulations allow just three tour vessels in Glacier Bay per day and access is limited to companies holding concession contracts with the National Park Service. Following a review by technical experts, American Cruise Lines was one of only four companies to receive the contract.

'The increase of prime use days is a testament to the ongoing partnership between American Cruise Lines and the National Park Service. We’re delighted to be part of the ongoing preservation and conservation of Glacier Bay,' said Charles Robertson, ceo of American Cruise Lines.

American Spirit cruises to Glacier Bay on its southeast Alaska itinerary. On this seven-night cruise, a National Park Service ranger comes aboard to share information about Glacier Bay’s marine wilderness and a Huna Tlingit cultural interpreter relates the human history of Glacier Bay’s native clans and people.

Passengers also get to see the south Sawyer Glacier at the end of Tracy Arm Fjord, the fishing village of Petersburg and the historic gold mining route of the Yukon and White Pass Railway.

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